CELEBRATING THE IMPACT
OF BLACK ANGELENOS TODAY

CELEBRATING THE IMPACT OF BLACK ANGELENOS TODAY

A BLACK HISTORY MONTH ARTS PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN INNER-CITY ARTS AND THE LOS ANGELES CHARGERS IMPACT FUND
A BLACK HISTORY MONTH ARTS PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN INNER-CITY ARTS AND THE LOS ANGELES CHARGERS IMPACT FUND
LA Chargers Impact Fund logo

For Black History Month, graduates of the Work of Art program, known as "Enterprisers", were commissioned as working artists to celebrate 10 Black Angelenos currently making their mark in distinct industries.

These research-based pieces highlight the lives or contributions of those who have impacted communities, industries, and generations. The industry sectors are Art & Architecture, Entertainment, Education, Fashion, Politics, Science & Healthcare, and Sports. On Monday, February 22, students presented finished projects via a Virtual Art Showcase to colleagues, mentors, the Chargers community, and the project's celebrants.
 

We are delighted to highlight these magnificent people— through art—and invite you to explore our young artists' work below!

Black. Lives. Matter.
First time here? Learn more about Inner-City Arts

These research-based pieces highlight the lives or contributions of those who have impacted communities, industries, and generations. The industry sectors are Art & Architecture, Entertainment, Education, Fashion, Politics, Science & Healthcare, and Sports. On Monday, February 22, students presented finished projects via a Virtual Art Showcase to colleagues, mentors, the Chargers community, and the project's celebrants.

We are delighted to highlight these magnificent people— through art—and invite you to explore our young artists' work below!

Black. Lives. Matter.

First time here?
Learn more about Inner-City Arts

Gabrielle Bullock Since the age of twelve, Gabrielle Bullock aspired to become an architect. The public housing she grew up in influenced her drive to make it happen. She has a strong desire to impact her community, and is able to do so with her position at Perkins & Will. Her current role as Director of Global Diversity allows her to combine her love for architecture and social justice.
Growth Within GROWTH WITHIN
ink pen on paper, 2021

Lucas Johnson, 18:

“I chose Gabrielle Bullock as my celebrant because I felt a connection to a project she is working on called Destination Crenshaw. I live less than 2 blocks away from Crenshaw Ave, and because her goal is to highlight Black art. With this project she wants to promote the idea of 'growing where you are planted'. I put my own spin on an abstraction of hers, depicting Crenshaw Ave.”

Michael Norice Michael Norice was born on August 20, 1980 in Watts, Los Angeles. His beginnings as a custom-shoe designer eventually blossomed into a need for something more. Along with his portraits, large scale murals, and paintings, his non-profit Artfully United allows for a simple and accessible way for his art to get into the inner cities. This not only showcases his skills on a larger scale, but also allows for positive and colorful messages to populate the city.
Aspire to Inspire ASPIRE TO INSPIRE
digital illustration, 2021

Noel Quintero, 21:

“I chose to highlight Mike Norice due to his unique message and approach to his artwork. My work can be seen as an homage to his public murals. Having him interact with his much used persona seemed like the right choice as I wanted him to really connect with the artwork he makes. His persona is used all throughout his various artworks and is used as a vessel for positivity and change.”

Cedrick O. Wallace Cedrik O. Wallace is an educator, peacemaker, mentor, poet, and cancer survivor. Wallace has overachieved academically and has obtained a Master's Degree in Special Education from Whittier College. He uses this at James A. Garfield High School where he is also a dean and crisis team member. After fighting and surviving stage 3 multiple myeloma cancer at age 40, he came back stronger. He now shares his words through poetry, inspiring others who are fighting this incurable disease or their own battles. Live to Inspire LIVE TO INSPIRE
paint markers on poster board, digital, 2021

Samantha Nieves, 20:

“I chose to honor and celebrate Wallace because of the impact he has on students and the communities he’s involved in. When I think of Wallace, I think of support, growth, and the overall essence of inspiration. We grow, we thrive, we survive, we uplift each other, and most importantly, we live to inspire. The battles we fight and experience can connect us, and Wallace’s role as an educator reflects just that.”
Burgundy Tears BURGUNDY TEARS
paint markers on poster board, video, 2021

Samantha Nieves, 20:

“This piece includes poetry read by Wallace himself during my artistic process. I chose to make this video to highlight a poem that reflects Wallace’s battle with multiple myeloma cancer. This video displays my process of absorbing the words and elements of Wallace’s battle. "Burgundy Tears" captures details of his internal anatomy, from antibodies to bones, to the poetry that reflects his vulnerability. The use of underlying yellow represents his success and strength throughout his journey.”

Kevin Ramsey Kevin Ramsey was born in New Orleans and currently resides in Los Angeles. He was raised by parents who both introduced the power of teaching at an early age. After attending his first live production, he knew that he wanted to be an actor, writer, and storyteller. He pursued his education at an HBCU and graduated from NYU with a BFA in Acting. Ramsey is a leading example of a multidisciplinary artist. From Broadway, he branched out into directing, producing, writing, brand management, and teaching. TV TV
short film, 2021

Ruby Barrios, 21:

“Kevin has an understanding that credits aren't what define an actor, but rather the impact we leave behind. As a teacher, Kevin continues to give me courage to be informed rather than identified by the media. Being a Hispanic female raised in a low socioeconomic area, I was always advised to settle or wait for the right doors to open. Despite the stories that are being broadcast, Kevin continues to vouch for my writing and experiences. TV represents the agency we have to consume media and change the narrative.”
Going Up GOING UP
short film, 2021

Ruby Barrios, 21:

“Kevin has always shared his gratitude for the learning process and the people he has met along the way with me. By exploring how Kevin was formed into the artist he is today, I am changing what the conventional idea of “success” looks like. The elevator itself shifts the focus to connection rather than “going up” a social ladder. The spotlight pays homage to every performer and the craft itself.”

Pierre Davis Pierre Davis was born in South Carolina, grew up in a military family, and traveled abroad often. She was inspired by her mother’s magazines and began sewing in middle school. Pierre attended the Art Institute of Seattle for two years and was invited to share her leather patchwork jackets at two artist-run exhibitions — Love City Love in Seattle and Sade in Los Angeles. In 2015, she founded the Los Angeles-based brand No Sesso.
Celebration of Body CELEBRATION OF BODY
acrylic on canvas panel, 2021

Jazlyn Archila, 20:

“I chose Pierre as my celebrant because I admire the inclusivity and creativity of her brand. 'Celebration of Body' represents the brand’s focus on presenting fashion as something celebratory and fun. The fashion industry tends to be shown in media as something that’s cut-throat or intimidating, contradicting what the purpose of fashion is.”
Sin Template SIN TEMPLATE
acrylic on canvas panel, 2021

Jazlyn Archila, 20:

“My piece, 'Sin Template' (Without Template), is also an homage to the non-conformity of Pierre's brand, No Sesso. I was inspired by the paper model templates used by fashion designers and how there’s no singular model to adhere to. The color palette is inspired by the colors used in one of the No Sesso dresses.”

Dr. Hawthorne Dr. Hilary L. Hawthorne received her Doctorate of Optometry degree from Pacific University of Optometry in 1992. She is a certified diplomate of the American Board of Optometry and holds several certifications in optometry. Dr. Hawthorne received the Young OD of the Year award in 2000 by the California Optometric Association and, in 2009, received a PowerPAC Award from the Los Angeles African American Political Action Committee. Visionary VISIONARY
resin, 2021

Ravin Brazfield, 22:

“My family has been patients of Dr. Hawthorne’s for 15 years. She and the staff at Community Eye Center provide a hospitable environment for their patients in South LA. Dr. Hawthorne’s work is greatly appreciated, especially since she provides quality care uncompromised by cost. This resin statue depicts an optometrist presenting a pair of glasses to the viewer, invoking the idea that vision is a human right, not a privilege.”

Alicia Garza Alongside Opal Tometi and Patrisse Cullors, Alicia Garza co-founded Black Lives Matter, a globally recognized project actively combating anti-Black state-sanctioned violence and the oppression of all Black people. Garza proclaims, “When Black people are free, everyone is free.” Garza, a queer Black woman, challenges the misconception that only cisgender men of color encounter police and state violence. To combat this type of racial violence, we must understand the implications of race, sexual orientation, and gender identity. #LetEqualityBloom #LETEQUALITYBLOOM
acrylic gouache, 2021

Ivy Salazar, 21:

“For thousands of years, flowers have been used to influence our responses and provoke emotions. Whether driven by aesthetics or something else, people have imbued flowers with personal, cultural, and religious significance. I chose to paint Alicia Garza surrounded by flowers to represent her personal journey and how she has bloomed into the political icon she is today. Instead of fearing repercussions or backlash, she is using her intersectionality as a source of power.”

Kelli Jackson Kelli Jackson grew up in the mini-market and has seen it become a community safe haven after being opened in 1997 by her father, Hank Jackson. While researching different art spaces in the Crenshaw area, she came across information about food deserts, which are areas with more liquor stores and fast-food restaurants than healthy food options. Jackson knew that she wanted to make changes, so she started attending workshops for the Los Angeles Food Policy Council. After coming back from her master's program at USC, she began to consider how she could better address the needs of her neighborhood and wanted to give something back to the community. #StrongerTogether #STRONGERTOGETHER
acrylic gouache, 2021

Ivy Salazar, 21:

“As a predominantly Black and Latino working-class community, we're undeserved and don't have access to healthy food options. I like that Kelli Jackson is taking a holistic approach to changing the relationship people have with food, especially since Black and Latino cultures are food-heavy.”

Dr. Prescod-Weinstein Born in El Sereno in East LA, Dr. Chanda Prescod-Weinstein is an Assistant Professor of Physics and a core faculty member of Women’s Gender Studies at the University of New Hampshire. Dr. Prescod boasts a lengthy professional background in both particle physics and astrology. She is a member of several committees for people of color, sexual orientation, and gender minorities in science, dedicated to ensuring equality in the scientific community. A Cosmic Story A COSMIC STORY
animation, 2021

Ravin Brazfield, 22:

“I chose to highlight Dr. Prescod because I resonate with her philosophy that science is a collaborative human story. She is ambitious and seeks to further our understanding of the universe as a whole. While she researches subjects like dark matter, she is also giving back to the communities she is a part of by highlighting minority scientists.”

Allyson Felix Allyson Felix is a track and field athlete who has won multiple gold medals in the Olympics, winning her first Olympic medal at just 18 years old. She studied Education at USC at the same time she was competing in the Olympics. Allyson became the youngest champion to ever compete, and two years later became the second woman to win 3 Olympic gold medals at the World Championships. Victorious VICTORIOUS
digital drawing, 2021

Lucas Johnson, 18:

“I chose Allyson Felix as my celebrant because she demonstrates that anything is possible. At such a young age, she was able to achieve extreme greatness, and I wanted to highlight that so I could inspire others to be great. Because Allyson got a degree in Education and her mom was a teacher, her greatness is partly to serve as inspiration for youth around the world.”
Her Claim To Fame HER CLAIM TO FAME
digital illustration, 2021

Noel Quintero, 21:

“I chose to highlight Allyson Felix due to her incredible feats and down-to-earth demeanor. Off the field, her drive to encourage fitness and education for children and others is equally as inspiring. This piece was made to not only recognize her hard work and accomplishments, but also demonstrate the loop of the people she’s hoping to impact and the people impacting and inspiring her.”

Thank you to the Los Angeles Chargers for engaging our young creatives for such a meaningful project!

ABOUT WORK OF ART -  SOCIAL ENTERPRISE

The Work of Art program at Inner-City Arts taps into the strengths of the vibrant youth of Los Angeles and supports their journey to assume their rightful place as drivers of the Creative Economy. These budding young professionals provide creative services for hire, under the direction of professional mentors and teaching artists. While employed as “Enterprisers”, they receive training and develop skills that support the development of an abundant and diverse supply of new talent into the creative industries.

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ABOUT THE LOS ANGELES CHARGERS IMPACT FUND

The Chargers Impact Fund is committed to helping families thrive in and around Southern California. Alex and Faye Spanos firmly believed that a solid family foundation was critical to success in life. That's why in 1995 they created the Chargers Impact Fund to focus on improving the circumstances of families and their communities. Over the years, the Fund has awarded more than $12 million in direct community assistance, including more than $6 million to public schools for badly needed physical fitness, nutrition and athletic programs and equipment. Today, in partnership with Chargers fans, volunteers and donors, the Chargers Impact Fund continues to honor Alex and Faye's legacy by helping to build strong support structures for youth, families, and their communities across Southern California.

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